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Old 25th September 2017, 23:47
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Default Researchers explain the mechanism of asexual reproduction in flatworms

Freshwater planarians, found around the world and commonly known as "flatworms," are famous for their regenerative prowess. Through a process called "fission," planarians can reproduce asexually by simply tearing themselves into two pieces—a head and a tail—which then go on to form two new worms within about a week.

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