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Old 30th November 2017, 23:52
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Default Parasitic worms don't just wait to be swallowed by new hosts

Contrary to widespread assumptions, parasitic nematodes that spread among mice via food may not wait passively to be swallowed. Instead, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, these tiny worms may use odors from host mice as cues to position themselves where they have a higher chance of being eaten.

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